Category Archives: Albums

Top 5 Album Releases Of 2020

2020 has been quite the odd year. During a normal time, I’d usually be doing more write ups, but this year has been a bit turbulent. There’s been an Earth stopping pandemic, protests, elections and more. The result of all of this has had a considerable effect on musicians, DJ’s, creatives and artists across the world. Not to mention the clubs and venues in which they performed in.

Indeed, there is no certainty for when life will return to a sense of pre-pandemic normalcy. Hopefully, the favorite haunts of memorable concerts will still be around, and there will be dance halls for those fond of the twist and pogo to congregate at again. Only time will tell.

However, despite these wild and unpredictable events, the music manages to live on. This year still saw releases by many notable artists. Almost too many to count. For 2020, I have chosen the records by Faz Waltz, Bad Nerves, The Speedways, Jacob T Skeen and Worst Horse as my top 5 releases for this year. Enjoy!

Faz WaltzRebel Kicks

Since 2007, Faz Waltz have been releasing hit maker records meant for another era. Each one of their new albums are tighter than the last. However, their 7th album Rebel Kicks is the Crème de la crème. Released on a pandemic ridden world this is music that uplifts and provides a much needed relief. Within this records grooves fans will hear the familiar influences of T-Rex  and David Bowie glam twisting the night away with late Beatles inspired rock n’ roll. Rebel Kick’s superbly demonstrates Faz Waltz’s maturing style and masterful pop-sensible hooks that makes their unique take on a 1970’s inspired rock n’ roll sound.

For the full review, click here!

Bad NervesSelf-Titled

Admittedly, I did not provide a write up for the Bad Nerves record. No doubt about it though, something about this record stuck like glue. Upon hearing the tracks on this release there is no shame by suggesting that it blew apart my rock n’ roll world.  These cats do what The Briefs did, but faster and with an impressively infectious intensity that few can dare match. This is the kind of music that jumping about like an idiot mixed up on a cocktail of formal one fuel is made for. If you like it was razer sharp riffs, high voltage vocals and of course electro-centric punk infused power pop, Bad Nerves are essential for you. Top tracks for consideration are “Baby Drummer,” “Can’t Be Mine,” and “Dreaming Boy.”

The Speedways Radio Sounds



NixBeat: What was the process like writing and recording Radio Sounds? How was it different than the work you did with Just Another Regular Summer?

Matthew: A fair few of the songs on Radio Sounds I’d already written around the time of Just Another Regular Summer. I also dug into my song book for older tunes like “This Aint A Radio Sound” and “Good Girls Don’t Break Hearts” ..then there were new songs that I wrote as a response to the first album – “In A World Without Love It’s Hard To Stay Young..,” “Daydreaming,” “Brown Eyes Look So Blue..,” “This Is About Girl Who Loves The Sun” etc.. So the writing process was more varied than the first record. Obviously with it being a full band this time there was a collaborative effort in terms of arrangement and individual parts which definitely gave the songs more of a band vibe than before. It’s much more satisfying as a song writer to hear other musicians play and interpret your stuff than to do everything yourself. It makes such a difference. Everyone contributed brilliantly in the studio too (including Jez who produced the album). I enjoyed making it & working with everyone. It turned out really well. A step up in quality for sure.

Jacob T Skeen Death, Thou Shalt Die

Listeners of this record ought to be warned that it is not uncommon to feel a staggering malevolence, as though the cold hand of death has drifted over your heart and into your soul.  The first track, “Elizabeth Felt Payne” captures this essence by luring the unwary listening into the depths of the demented. It’s defined by the wailing razor sharp riffs and Skeen’s booming vocals. This is distorted doom blues at its finest.

Read the full article here!

Worst HorseSelf-Titled

The album as a whole is a trip. It’s got the psychedelic notions that with under the right conditions will evoke a out of mind experience. Songs like “Let The Pain In” carry on the introspective nature that defines this work. It’s mellow, but subtly provoking. This is the same with the track “House of Bees.” Though in contrast, this song has more of the dissociated feel that is also found in Worst Horse.

For the full article click here!

Duncan Reid and The Big Heads — Don’t Blame Yourself

Duncan Reid and The Big Heads

Don’t Blame Yourself

LBH Records

Street: 05/15/2020

There’s something impressively enamoring about Duncan Reid and The Big Heads. They boast a definitive, yet familiar vein. Their new record Don’t Blame Yourself blends power pop with punk sensibilities by twisting it into a definitive pub rock sound. That being said, this isn’t adolescent rock n’ roll. It’s music that is well refined and remains consistently engaging throughout.  Fans of Reid’s previous ventures will find a home with this record. Especially if they like The Boys or even  Eddie and The Hot Rods.

When picking this album up, it’s important to approach it with an open mind. It’s not suffering from the plague of mediocrity. Duncan Reid And The Big Heads are not just another Ramones-influenced rock group. They have years of experience that explore a remarkable depth of style.

The theme of Don’t Blame Yourself seems to be one of coming into a sense of maturity if not a sense of impending mortality. This is demonstrated by many of this records tracks emphasizing a certain reflection toward life lived and lost. Some tracks like “Oh What A Lovely Day” celebrate power pop melody’s coupled with calming, yet ruminative lyrical properties.  Other songs like this are “Came The Day,” and “Dave.”

Many of their tracks have an upbeat  nature to them and are arguably infectious to the ears. This is mostly true with tracks like “Your Future Ex Wife,” “To Live Or Live Not” and of course the ever so charmingly titled “Motherfucker.”

Singing along to this record isn’t required, but it’ll be hard not to do after some pint-sized liquid courage. This is particularly true with “Motherfucker” and “To Live Or Live Not.” The former has the fun and catchy chorus derived from the title of the track. Besides, who doesn’t want to sing “motherfucker” at the top of their lungs?

The latter, “To Live Or Live Not” is a track starts out strong and grips you. This is arguably thanks to Reid’s catchy word smithing ,and the tracks prominent chugging riffs.   Not to mention it’s power pop driven with certain harmonies that stick with you like glue. It’s only three minutes long, but the smoothness of it’s delivery makes “To Live Or Live Not” feel short and sweet.

The title song “Don’t Blame Yourself” is easily my favorite track on this record. It’s a true and blue punk rock n’ roll tune.  This is thanks to the bluesy rock driven riffs that give “Don’t Blame Yourself” a definitive edge.  It’s very reminiscent of something TV Smith later work encompasses. Another track like this is “Little Miss Understood.”

In Don’t Blame Yourself, listeners will find a range to work with. One moment it’s a tune to groove to, the other a song that invokes strong memories and emotions. This release seems oddly appropriate for this year. This is because 2020 is a year representing a challenge and shock to the normalcies of day-to-day life.

While surely recorded pre-covid 19, Don’t Blame Yourself is almost perfect for the slowness of today’s reality. After all, an album exploring a mid-life crisis is apt for anyone coping with the turbulence of 2020. Nevertheless, be sure to check out Don’t Blame Yourself.  It’s good and ought to be listened to.

For more about Duncan Reid and The Big Heads, check out their website!

Faz Waltz — Rebel Kicks

Faz Waltz

Rebel Kicks

Spaghetty Town Records

Street: 04/20/2020

Since 2007, Faz Waltz have been releasing hit maker records meant for another era. Each one of their new albums are tighter than the last. However, their 7th album Rebel Kicks is the Crème de la crème. Released on a pandemic ridden world this is music that uplifts and provides a much needed relief. Within this records grooves fans will hear the familiar influences of T-Rex  and David Bowie glam twisting the night away with late Beatles inspired rock n’ roll. Rebel Kick’s superbly demonstrates Faz Waltz’s maturing style and masterful pop-sensible hooks that makes their unique take on a 1970’s inspired rock n’ roll sound.

With Rebel Kicks, Faz Waltz bring forth a nostalgic style meant to tug on youthful determination to inspire the soul. This is demonstrated with the first track, “Grown Up Guy.” This is a song about empowerment in a crazy world where the right time simply exist is always challenged by the powers that be. It’s a killer song that grabs a hold of the listener with an infectious, yet punchy feel. “Grown Up Guy” is also the A-side to the single released on February 21,2020. 

The title track “Rebel Kicks” is a feelgood kind of track. It’s a fast and upbeat rebel anthem. Not surprising since that’s what Faz Waltz is good at knocking. out. Still this one is fun thanks to a strong back beat and Jerry Lewis-like piano playing. Play this loud and the result should motivate it’s listeners to bounce around.

The tracks that stand out on this record are “Got Me Goin,” “Rock n’ Roll Is Tough” and “Do You Remember.” “Got Me Goin” is a mid-tempo groover. It boasts certain junkshop sensibilities that ought to make ones head bop.  I would not be surprised if this tune is dug up in 40 years and placed on a glam rock revival comp meant to commemorate the 2020’s bovver revival with the purpose to initiate the next generation of glitter rockers. 

“Rock N’ Roll Is Tough” could almost be lumped into the standard section of rock song begging for for the golden days of rock music.  This number is meant to be played loud and be danced too.With this track Faz Waltz deliver an almost Hector-like approach by blending a joyous rock n’ roll feeling with a fresh sense of sentimentality. This is done in large part thanks to the lyrics, which are catchy as hell.

“Do You Remember” is a track that tugs on the heart strings. It brings forth Faz Waltz’s T-Rex and Ziggy Stardust operatic influence to the forefront.  Musically and lyrically, it captures a sense of yearning for the past. By doing this, it becomes a song that one would play in dark lit bar to conjure memories of those not present. If you needed a glam track to get you in the feels, “Do You Remember” is it.  

Other songs worthy of note are “Last Train To Nowhere,” “Born In The Wrong Time,” and “Is it Love.” “Last Train To Nowhere” is a true and blue rock n’ roll number. It’s a fast retro-rock number very much in the same vain as somethings recorded by Mud or Showaddywaddy—just minus the doo wop.  “Born In The Wrong Time” is an entertaining track that celebrates a well-covered theme of being born in the wrong decade.

“Is It Love” is a great track to conclude this album with.  If there was a sound that was ever meant to be a homage to Marc Bolan’s style of glam, this is it. “Is It Love” is a smooth and track that treads around the feelings of insecurity surrounding love. It’s glam rock that invites it’s listeners to sway to a mid-tempo beat and fuzz guitar.

Overall, Rebel Kicks is a record full of hits and arguably no misses. Faz Waltz knocks out every number flawlessly. These are the kind of tunes that demand one to get up, move and groove to sounds meant to invigorate the wayward soul. It’s the kind of music that offers a renewed imagination to the forever youthful rebellion evoked by over 70 years of rock n’ roll music.

Rebel Kicks ought to be listened thoroughly to by anyone daring to have dedication to being a rock n’ roller. This record shows off a decade worth of consistent hard work. Their dedication to their craft is almost second to none. Furthermore, Faz Waltz’s material is not the simply regurgitated stuff made by imitators. These guys are the real deal and they bring to the table sounds that are truly exiting. Now go pick up this record and kick out some jams.

Worst Horse — Self-Titled

Worst Horse

Self-Titled

Self-Released

Released : 4/05/2020

Worst Horse, aka Margot Apricot, is an artist who boasts many talents. These are found, but not limited through their unique screen printed designs, paintings and of course through their music. Formerly Apricot was known for performing in the multi-genre’d Lube and the noise-punk outfit Brain Bagz. Now, under the name Worst Horse, they have released the first album from their solo work. Consequently this is also the album name. The overwhelming feeling that Worst Horse betrays is a demand of being unforgivingly introspective. It  blends notions of haunted isolation with a kind simplicity, but unique 1980’s electronic vibrancy.

Lyrically, Worst Horse sings about themes of hurt with a kind poetic disassociation.  Musically, it’s twisting styles of electro-art-punk with obsessive droning and a  definitive beat. This is of course a courtesy of the hollowness of a drum machine. It is particularly evident when listening to tracks like “Cleansing Breath” or “Past Needles.”

Other notable tracks such as “Left A Mark” carry with the sermonizing style of beat poetry. In this song, Worst Horse speaks about sobering reflections of a life of struggle and pain.Combined with the electronic noise reminiscent of a Blade Runner like film score, the song has an overwhelming, yet alien feel. It’s short and sweet, but quite sobering.

In Worst Horse,  there are also notable covers from artists such as Rabbit’s “Calcifer” and The Bee Gee’s “How Deep Is Your love.” In their own way Worst Horse pays a ultimate homage to these artists. They uniquely perform these songs with a certain delight. With “Calcifer,” the original captures the essence of playful indie-folk with impunity. Worst Horse’s version is heavy with a sorrowful orchestral flair.

The original version of the Bee Gee’s “How Deep Is Your Love” is among the iconic songs of the 1970’s disco era. It’s a song that is moderately upbeat, cheesy and meant for the dance floor of  a Saturday night boogie. When Worst Horse performs this song, the trajectory is different, but with some striking similarities. 

For this cover, Worst Horse evokes a style that is different. It celebrates the primitive sensibilities with the numbing sensations of disco twisting into a new wave-like flair. Although this cover has a kind of melancholy  about it,  Apricot still knocks this number out.  That being said, if listeners want to rave on with “How Deep Is Your Love” the assistance of substances for this gothic-esque cover might allow for some slow grooving fun.

The album as a whole is a trip. It’s got the psychedelic notions that with under the right conditions will evoke a out of mind experience.  Songs like “Let The Pain In” carry on the introspective nature that defines this work. It’s mellow, but subtly provoking. This is the same with the track “House of Bees.” Though in contrast, this song has more of the dissociated feel that is also found in Worst Horse.

When listening to Worst Horst the result is like being taken on quite the dynamic trip. This should not be a surprise given the caliber of the Worst Horse’s artistic ability. As seen with their body of work, it blazes past any limitations.   

However, with this release, one may tread with some caution. This album may take a special if not sobering frame of mind to digest. One should be ready to let go of their inhabitations and be ready for songs that beg one to look deep into their soul. If that soul is troubled then this album may hit home in the most profound ways.

The Scaners X Ray Glasses: On 7”

The Scaners

X Ray Glasses: On 7”

Spaghetty Town Records

Street: February 12, 2020

Blasting off into outer space are the gonzo space rock n’ rollers The Scaners. From Lyon France, their mission is to abduct and assimilate the uninitiated with their electro-punk sound. It’s an alien technique meant for the supersonic and intergalactic minded weirdos of this third rock from the sun. Think of their music concoction as boasting a mix of Readymades sprinkled in with Miscalculations and the hollowness of Gary Numan’s  Tubeway Army.  

The Scaners no doubt have an impressive sound and it shows in their recordings. The A-side’s “X-Ray Glasses: On” captures their tenacity. This track is pretty straight forward.  It starts off with a synth heavy intro that leads into an abrasive beat. “X-Ray Glasse: On” is perfect to sway and lose one’s the mind to. Lyrically this ditty is simple and repetitive. However, what makes it is the disembodied vocals on top of the hollowness of the electro-punk sound, which is like hearing a cyborg play with a distorted 1970’s punk style.

“Alien Boy” is a fast and furious tune. This is the track that is over as soon as it begins.  It follows the same method of electric desolation as previous Scaners material, albeit with a more primitive feel.  Think of it as Germs-esque, but electrified.

“I Really Want To Know” has a mode that carries a little more familiarity with tracks like “X-Ray Glasses:On.” It’s fast and frantic as though being like being shocked alive on a live wire. This tune boasts a definable punk spite style. If listeners don’t find themselves pogoing like a mother fucker then something is wrong with the stereo.  

These tunes don’t betray notions of a cheap parlor trick or a punk rock sound done repeatedly to death. Quite the opposite, The Scaners inspire signs of life into the spirit of punk with something discernibly exciting. This record invokes a style that is rapid and vibrant. It’s an approach that The Scaners very much their own. Nonetheless, it hints toward the playful line of The Briefs but with a synthetic nature of The Marked Men or Radioactivity.

Even though my favorite track on this record is X-Ray “Glasses:On.” As a whole though, this 7” is some brilliant work. Mind you, this is not music for the faint hearted, but for the stargazed rockers of this age. If anything is to evidenced by this record, this is strong material and I have yet to hear anything to the contrary. Don’t waste time. Be sure to get this record.

Jacob T Skeen — Death, Thou Shalt Die

Jacob T Skeen

Death Thou Shall Die

Self-Released

Release:  April 6, 2020

From beneath the murky smog enveloping the now empty streets of Salt Lake City comes the haunting sounds of Jacob T Skeen.  As a one man band, Jacob T Skeen blends swampy blues induced garage rock with heaviness of metal into distorted doom-like concoction of psychedelia. Listening to his new record Death, Thou Shalt Die is akin to hearing music transmitted from the airwaves of the damned. It’s an intoxicating sensation, as though one is hearing the long lost preaching of the lord of the underworld them-self.

Listeners of this record ought to be warned that it is not uncommon to feel a staggering malevolence, as though the cold hand of death has drifted over your heart and into your soul.  The first track, “Elizabeth Felt Payne” captures this essence by luring the unwary listening into the depths of the demented. It’s defined by the wailing razor sharp riffs and Skeen’s booming vocals. This is distorted doom blues at its finest.

The second track, “When They Lay Me Down,” follows along with the previous song’s musical style.  This song carries a sound that lures the eager listener into voodoo-like trance. This is due to Skeen’s hypnotic vocals and freight train heavy beat. Not only that, but there is something delightfully primitive about this track that captures the raw energy of delightfully sinful garage rock.  This is the track that was meant to invite the dead back from the grave. 

 The third track, “Working Ministry Blues, is by contrast slower in tempo and much heavier in tone. This is the kind of tune that ought to envelop the mind and cause it to drift away with certain madness. With “Working Ministry Blues,” Skeen shows that he can capture the one’s wayward mind under his signature rock n’ roll spell. This is helped along with the introduction of an organ to give this track a being in a Sunday service-like feel. 

“Mourn with those that Mourn” carries on with the same kind of heaviness as “Working Ministry Blues.” Produced with a brain bashing beat, this song boasts definable dread. It’s the perfect music for recently dead. This is music to feel the dread and empty totality of death with.

 “Desolate Home” has some of the similarities of the former tracks. However, this song produces an infectious instrumental swagger. Vocally, Skeen sings as through he is drowning with the devils juice in his lungs. The effect is disturbing. So, naturally it’s perfect for the demented bluesy garage rock that Skeen is known for.

Other tracks like “Storehouse of Souls” are upbeat and rock n’ rolling. This is the music to stomp your feet and jump around to. Stylistically, it’s in line with Bloodshot Bill’s contemporary brand of rockabilly raucous.

The track that stands out on this album is “Ecclesiasticus 21:10.” This song retains Skeen’s demonic vocals. The difference though, is the very metal influenced instrumentals.  Cue some Black Sabbath with some swampland-like sound and you’ve got “Ecclesiasticus 21:10.”

Waste no time on this record. Be sure to pick up Death Thou, Shalt Die wherever available . This is an album of fine gothic scripture and sermon-esque reverence. This new record betrays a psychedelic sound unlike anything else currently reverberating in the city of salt. This kind of rock n’ roll testament is exercised similarly by the likes of Reverend Beat-Man, Bloodshot Bill, and even Daddy Longlegs.  Fans of these artists will find Death, Thou Shalt Die is the much needed deliverance molding apocalyptic notions with an appealingly wicked nature.  Now, go forth and dig this tunes.

Faz Waltz — Grown Up Guy / C’mon Liar 7″

Faz Waltz

Grown Up Guy

Spaghetty Town Records

Street: February 24, 2020

Faz Waltz blast back through the airwaves with their new Grown Up Guy / C’mon Liar single.  If you like power-pop driven glam with rebel flare, then this single is for you.  Fans of Faz Waltz will be thrilled to find that this record continues to show off their killer 1970’s inspired glam rock style—particularly in the vein of Queen, T-Rex and Ziggy Stardust-era sounds.  Grown Up Guy also boldly celebrates their familiar themes of rock n’ roll is here whether you like it or not. This, like former releases, is done with boasting bovver rock roots with a defiant proto-punk attitude.

This single single starts off strong. The A-side’s “Grown Up Guy” is song about empowerment in an ever increasingly hostile world where the right to exist is challenged by society and government alike. This a killer rock n’ roll track. This blends punk and contemporary glam rock, but with a nostalgic and punchy feel.  It’s the kind of music that makes you feel good, but is ultimately a song meant for the rebel at heart.   

The B-side’s “C’Mon Liar” is a real banger. This track is about being aware of who are your real friends and who the fakes are hanging around. “C’mon Liar” is antagonistic rock n’ roll with a catchy chorus that is easy to bounce about to. It falls stylistically in line with junkshop legends like The Jook and Hello. This songs theme unapologetically pulls no punches and also finds itself with a definable early 1970’s proto-punky attitude, but with certain pop sensibilities.  No doubt  it’s the kind of music that glam punk is all about.

With over ten years of material and performances behind them, Faz Waltz iconolcast rock n’ roll anthems remain relevant and have yet to disappoint. If this single is any indication of what their next album Rebel Kicks is going to be like, then it looks like it’ll be worth picking up.

This record is a must have for fans of Faz Waltz and more importantly of glam rock. Those not yet familiar with this groups discography can definitely start here, but should then dig into their previously released albums. Like this single, there are many gems to check out.

However, the first thing to do is to get this record and play it for your mates.  This is the good stuff, and as history has shown with Faz Waltz, you won’t be led astray.

Fast Eddy — Toofer One 7″

Fast Eddy

Toofer One

Spaghetty Town Records

Released 09/12/2019

Hailing from Denver, Colorado, Fast Eddy’s take on rock n’ roll with something meant for the fast and furious. They are comprised of members of Denver’s notable acts, such as Dirty Few and Itchy O. Their release of the Toofer One EP is a special treat that touches on a nostalgic sense of style. It’s the kind of stuff that harkens on sounds emanating from a 1970’s power pop driven classic rock n’ roll sound.

Fast Eddy’s Toofer One EP starts out strong with “Hurricane Alley.” This number emphasizes a nod toward 70’s classic rock through its rolling mid-tempo beat. Overall, it’s a slick and groovy number. It’s short and sweet, but entertaining.

The second track, “Milwaukee” starts off with a jumping beat and carries on with a bit more vocal depth. It’s a kind of nostalgic song with a strong build up to a chorus that is easy to follow. Under the right influence, listening and singing along to “Milwaukee” should inspire one to get out their zippo, light one up and exhibit some kumbaya feels.

The B-side of the Toofer One EP boasts the real charm.  The track is called “Lost.” It’s the track that shows how fast Fast Eddy can really go. Starting off, “Lost” shocks and awes it’s listeners with razor sharp riffs.  With “Lost,” Fast Eddy wastes little time in enveloping those who spin this record in a frantic notions of blitz-fast rock n’ roll. It’s probably meant to be played loud enough to invoke public citation warnings from the local goon squad. 

Fast Eddy’s Toofer One EP is solid for those who want sounds evolving past the simplicity of wild rock n’ roll. This record was produced by Dan Dixton and Tuk Smith (Biters) in Atlanta, Georgia.  Out of the three tracks, the B-Side’s fast and raucous “Lost” is my favorite. That being said, this is the kind of record that may grow on you after a few listens. When playing Fast Eddy for your mates, start with “Lost.” You might blow away expectations and then lull friends or foes to the infectious songs on this records A-side.

Suicide Generation — Prisoner of Love 7″

Suicide Generation

Prisoner of Love

Dirty Water Records/ Spaghetty Town Records

Released: 10/11/2019

To those not already familiar with Suicide Generation, there should be warning label on their records. These cats come out of the back alleys of London and in their wake is sonic whirlwind of chaos and destruction. They produce a sound that demands a nod to Detroit’s own The Stooges, but with a sonic flair that is ultimately their own. The results are arguably brain-splitting. Not surprisingly then that their new single Prisoner Of Love follows directly in line with this notion.

The title track “Prisoner Of Love” holds back nothing.Upon listening to this track, one can almost feel the unbridled nature of Suicide Generation blasting through their speakers. It’s a vicious assault of ear-piercing garage punk. If one has been lucky enough to survive one of their shows, then hear this shredding mess ought to bring back fond memories of a live performance.  So, beware.

On the B-side of this EP are two tracks boasting of primitive rock n’ roll. The first track “Shitty In The City” harkens toward the raw style of 1970’s punk. It’s kind of along the likes of The Stukas or Johnny and the Self Abusers.  If it wasn’t a contemporary song, it’d be surprising that “Shitty In The City” wouldn’t be found on a Killed By Death Compilation.

The other track “Rotten Mind” follows in the somewhere in between “Prisoner Of Love”  and “Shitty In The City.” It’s a rapid fire punk number that holds no prisoners and is over almost as soon as it begins. Under the right elicit conditions, this track ought to inspire thrashing out of control.  For the uninitiated and delicate “Rotten Mind” is an essential concoction of primal punk rock.

Suicide Generation’s Prisoner Of Love single shows remarkable promise.  It’s a record that demonstrates their ability to be tight while still remaining as unbridled and savage as ever. Barring the ability to seem them live, having the volume peaking in the red will give listeners a glance into what it’s like to witness the ferocity of Suicide Generation’s live act—as well as some hearing loss. For that simple reason, check out Prisoner Of Love. It’s not to be overlooked, especially by any self-styled rock n’ roll degenerate.

Fore more, check out their Bandcamp!

Daddy Long Legs–Lowdown Ways

Daddy Long Legs

Lowdown Ways

Released: May 10,2019

Yep Roc Records

Daddy Long Legs are a band worth catching live. If not able to see perform, then getting their record is the next best thing. Their new album, Lowdown Ways is not to be missed. It ain’t no cheap burger joint rock n’ roll diddy. Rather, it’s a record that captures Daddy Long Legs superior ability to meld wild pub rock with Delta-styled blues that invigorates the soul with sinful thoughts of whiskey and wine.

Overall this record demonstrates certain level of wild brilliance and charm.  Daddy Long Legs boasts powerful pub rock n’ roll by invoking nods to the greats like Eddy and The Hot Rods, but really channel the living spirit of Dr. Feelgood during the Wilko Johnson years. This is evident by vocalist Brian Hurd’s rough, whiskey soaked voice and mannerisms that bring forth a fondness for the late rock n’ roll gentleman Lee Brillaux.

Low Down Ways starts off strong with “Theme From Daddy Long Legs.” It’s a harmonica bluesy number with a kind of southern gospel feel to it. As if praising the long lost gods of rock n’ roll, Hurd delivers a fiery sermon for his listeners.

The second number “Pink Lemonade.” This  is the tune that ought to be the  staring single of this album. It’s got a heavy fuzz feel with a kind of primitive garage sound. It kind of reminds me of being in the vein of Dr. Feelgood’s “Sneakin’ Suspicion,” but more rough and swampy.  

The track like “Glad Rag Ball” gives off an old timey party feel. This is the song to play loud while induced by a little inhibition, all the while jumping about.  It’s got jumping pub rock riffs, wailing harmonica and a stomping beat. ”Glad Rag Ball” is perfect for starting any party.

A similar notion can be said for “Mornin’ Noon and Nite” and “Bad Neighborhood.” Hurd’s wailing gritty vocals along with it’s punchy beat define these songs.  His passionate style breaks through the shackles of the mundane and deliver something uniquely raw.

Lowdown Ways is a perfect album to play alongside the greats of pub rock. It’s raucous rock n’ roll played out with suburb simplicity.  Daddy Long Legs really own a skill reserved reminiscent of the likes of Reverend Beat-Man, The Pretty Things, Jacob T. Skeen and of course the previously mentioned Dr. Feelgood.

One can easily feel nostalgic with the contents of their record collection.  It’s important to note that Lowdown Ways though isn’t just some throwaway wannabe retro record. This is rock n’ roll that carries forth a definitive legacy that not only excites but also mystifies it’s listener with sounds that nostalgic but fresh for this day and age.

If you’ve managed to see Daddy Long Legs live, then you’ve been blessed by the living breathing preachers of music with roots immersed in excellence. If you’ve got their record, then you are lucky enough to have the next best thing. Be sure to play loud and without caution.