Tag Archives: Worst Horse

Top 5 Album Releases Of 2020

2020 has been quite the odd year. During a normal time, I’d usually be doing more write ups, but this year has been a bit turbulent. There’s been an Earth stopping pandemic, protests, elections and more. The result of all of this has had a considerable effect on musicians, DJ’s, creatives and artists across the world. Not to mention the clubs and venues in which they performed in.

Indeed, there is no certainty for when life will return to a sense of pre-pandemic normalcy. Hopefully, the favorite haunts of memorable concerts will still be around, and there will be dance halls for those fond of the twist and pogo to congregate at again. Only time will tell.

However, despite these wild and unpredictable events, the music manages to live on. This year still saw releases by many notable artists. Almost too many to count. For 2020, I have chosen the records by Faz Waltz, Bad Nerves, The Speedways, Jacob T Skeen and Worst Horse as my top 5 releases for this year. Enjoy!

Faz WaltzRebel Kicks

Since 2007, Faz Waltz have been releasing hit maker records meant for another era. Each one of their new albums are tighter than the last. However, their 7th album Rebel Kicks is the Crème de la crème. Released on a pandemic ridden world this is music that uplifts and provides a much needed relief. Within this records grooves fans will hear the familiar influences of T-Rex  and David Bowie glam twisting the night away with late Beatles inspired rock n’ roll. Rebel Kick’s superbly demonstrates Faz Waltz’s maturing style and masterful pop-sensible hooks that makes their unique take on a 1970’s inspired rock n’ roll sound.

For the full review, click here!

Bad NervesSelf-Titled

Admittedly, I did not provide a write up for the Bad Nerves record. No doubt about it though, something about this record stuck like glue. Upon hearing the tracks on this release there is no shame by suggesting that it blew apart my rock n’ roll world.  These cats do what The Briefs did, but faster and with an impressively infectious intensity that few can dare match. This is the kind of music that jumping about like an idiot mixed up on a cocktail of formal one fuel is made for. If you like it was razer sharp riffs, high voltage vocals and of course electro-centric punk infused power pop, Bad Nerves are essential for you. Top tracks for consideration are “Baby Drummer,” “Can’t Be Mine,” and “Dreaming Boy.”

The Speedways Radio Sounds



NixBeat: What was the process like writing and recording Radio Sounds? How was it different than the work you did with Just Another Regular Summer?

Matthew: A fair few of the songs on Radio Sounds I’d already written around the time of Just Another Regular Summer. I also dug into my song book for older tunes like “This Aint A Radio Sound” and “Good Girls Don’t Break Hearts” ..then there were new songs that I wrote as a response to the first album – “In A World Without Love It’s Hard To Stay Young..,” “Daydreaming,” “Brown Eyes Look So Blue..,” “This Is About Girl Who Loves The Sun” etc.. So the writing process was more varied than the first record. Obviously with it being a full band this time there was a collaborative effort in terms of arrangement and individual parts which definitely gave the songs more of a band vibe than before. It’s much more satisfying as a song writer to hear other musicians play and interpret your stuff than to do everything yourself. It makes such a difference. Everyone contributed brilliantly in the studio too (including Jez who produced the album). I enjoyed making it & working with everyone. It turned out really well. A step up in quality for sure.

Jacob T Skeen Death, Thou Shalt Die

Listeners of this record ought to be warned that it is not uncommon to feel a staggering malevolence, as though the cold hand of death has drifted over your heart and into your soul.  The first track, “Elizabeth Felt Payne” captures this essence by luring the unwary listening into the depths of the demented. It’s defined by the wailing razor sharp riffs and Skeen’s booming vocals. This is distorted doom blues at its finest.

Read the full article here!

Worst HorseSelf-Titled

The album as a whole is a trip. It’s got the psychedelic notions that with under the right conditions will evoke a out of mind experience. Songs like “Let The Pain In” carry on the introspective nature that defines this work. It’s mellow, but subtly provoking. This is the same with the track “House of Bees.” Though in contrast, this song has more of the dissociated feel that is also found in Worst Horse.

For the full article click here!

Worst Horse — Self-Titled

Worst Horse

Self-Titled

Self-Released

Released : 4/05/2020

Worst Horse, aka Margot Apricot, is an artist who boasts many talents. These are found, but not limited through their unique screen printed designs, paintings and of course through their music. Formerly Apricot was known for performing in the multi-genre’d Lube and the noise-punk outfit Brain Bagz. Now, under the name Worst Horse, they have released the first album from their solo work. Consequently this is also the album name. The overwhelming feeling that Worst Horse betrays is a demand of being unforgivingly introspective. It  blends notions of haunted isolation with a kind simplicity, but unique 1980’s electronic vibrancy.

Lyrically, Worst Horse sings about themes of hurt with a kind poetic disassociation.  Musically, it’s twisting styles of electro-art-punk with obsessive droning and a  definitive beat. This is of course a courtesy of the hollowness of a drum machine. It is particularly evident when listening to tracks like “Cleansing Breath” or “Past Needles.”

Other notable tracks such as “Left A Mark” carry with the sermonizing style of beat poetry. In this song, Worst Horse speaks about sobering reflections of a life of struggle and pain.Combined with the electronic noise reminiscent of a Blade Runner like film score, the song has an overwhelming, yet alien feel. It’s short and sweet, but quite sobering.

In Worst Horse,  there are also notable covers from artists such as Rabbit’s “Calcifer” and The Bee Gee’s “How Deep Is Your love.” In their own way Worst Horse pays a ultimate homage to these artists. They uniquely perform these songs with a certain delight. With “Calcifer,” the original captures the essence of playful indie-folk with impunity. Worst Horse’s version is heavy with a sorrowful orchestral flair.

The original version of the Bee Gee’s “How Deep Is Your Love” is among the iconic songs of the 1970’s disco era. It’s a song that is moderately upbeat, cheesy and meant for the dance floor of  a Saturday night boogie. When Worst Horse performs this song, the trajectory is different, but with some striking similarities. 

For this cover, Worst Horse evokes a style that is different. It celebrates the primitive sensibilities with the numbing sensations of disco twisting into a new wave-like flair. Although this cover has a kind of melancholy  about it,  Apricot still knocks this number out.  That being said, if listeners want to rave on with “How Deep Is Your Love” the assistance of substances for this gothic-esque cover might allow for some slow grooving fun.

The album as a whole is a trip. It’s got the psychedelic notions that with under the right conditions will evoke a out of mind experience.  Songs like “Let The Pain In” carry on the introspective nature that defines this work. It’s mellow, but subtly provoking. This is the same with the track “House of Bees.” Though in contrast, this song has more of the dissociated feel that is also found in Worst Horse.

When listening to Worst Horst the result is like being taken on quite the dynamic trip. This should not be a surprise given the caliber of the Worst Horse’s artistic ability. As seen with their body of work, it blazes past any limitations.   

However, with this release, one may tread with some caution. This album may take a special if not sobering frame of mind to digest. One should be ready to let go of their inhabitations and be ready for songs that beg one to look deep into their soul. If that soul is troubled then this album may hit home in the most profound ways.