Tag Archives: climate change

Art Against Doom: Creative Activism in the Face of Climate Change

By Abigail Bowé

If you’ve ever taken a course in the Carolyn and Kem Gardner Commons, perhaps you’ve seen a large installation — up on the second floor — of a quote from pop artist Andy Warhol printed along a wall of frozen clocks. It reads, “They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.” Obstacles such as racism, ableism, sexism, homophobia and other prejudices are not as severe today as they once were only because of those who fought to improve the world in the first place. The future is nothing but potential until those living in the present claim it. One team of artists and activists in Salt Lake City are doing just that. They’ve banded together to tackle one of the most divisive and pressing problems of our era — the issue of climate change — through the upcoming grassroots exhibit “Art Against Doom.”

Read the full article published by The Daily Utah Chronicle!

Art Against Doom: Using a Visual Medium to Inform us of Climate Change


By Eric U. Norris [eubass5@gmail.com]

Some of you may have noticed, but we’ve been living with an anvil-like chandelier looming over us by a thread that we either refer to as “climate change,” “global warming” or “the impending doom of life on earth as we know it!” Whether you choose to ignore it or not, it is there, and people like Nicholas Kuzmack and Kady Newland are attempting to inform everybody of the current and future effects of climate change through the first in what will be a series of art events under the moniker Art Against Doom……

Read the full article published by @ SLUG Magazine!!

Against Doom: A Climate Insurgency Manuel

Against Doom: A Climate Insurgency Manuel
By Jeremy Brecher
PM Press
Release: 07.2017

If humanity is to have a future, it needs a strategy to combat the threat of climate change. The threat of climate change is overwhelming and even now we are only beginning to grasp its effects on our fragile world. Before the election of President Trump, it seemed that humanity was willfully strolling its way to a climate catastrophe. Although agreements such as the Paris Climate Agreement offer loose frameworks to transition to a fossil fuel free civilization, this historic agreement falls short of a binding resolution. Admittingly, it’s a vocal show that the world is waking up to its greatest challenge, but the agreement is vague in its promise to stall the rising of world temperatures to and over 2C from pre-industrial revolution levels and certain climate catastrophe. Now, after the election, and the United States recent withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement, it seems our future is on the brink of disaster. In his new book Against Doom, author Jeremy Brecher provides the outline for a strategy to move forward.

Against Doom is sort of a manifesto. It covers a wide arrange of ideas and is broken up into two sections: The first highlights a growing global insurgency against forces that seek to cause climate catastrophe. While the second outlines bold struggles to combat the threat of climate change. Brecher discusses examples of resistance that spans the world, the shortcomings of the Paris Climate Agreement and the importance of grassroots people power against the fossil fuel industry. One example Brecher highlights are the protests led by low-income, predominately African-American residents in Albany, New York, against the highly volatile “bomb trains” (fuel trains) that run through their neighborhoods. In this Brecher provides an analysis on this community’s grassroots, non-violent resistance—specifically community outreach, and mutual support and civil disobedience— toward inconveniencing the fossil fuel industry in their neighborhood.

The second section of Against Doom, Brecher proposes bold strategies to tackle climate change. This includes a fossil fuel freeze which implements a halt on all new fossil fuel infrastructures, plans to turn public opinion against the fossil fuel industry and challenging hopelessness with action. One of Brecher’s proposals is to utilize existing political forces to erode and ultimately challenge the legality of continuously using fossil fuels. He touches on an idea called the “Public Trust’—a proposal where the world, its resources and its wonders belong to humanity as a whole and not just a select few. Brecher backs this argument with examples of disobedience and legal challenges that have been won and subsequently put a check on the fossil fuel industry. Although, Brecher points out some success, he emphasizes that those wishing to conduct direct action should be prepared for the consequences—for better or worse.

In Against Doom, Brecher ties complex strategies for a just transition to a sustainable civilization that seeks broad cooperation from diverse organizations and groups. This book is a great read, alongside other works that dive deeper into the roots behind ecological injustice and climate change. Brecher stresses the importance of the responsibility of change at the feet of the people, not the government’s.

The ideas proposed emphasis a peaceful resistance against the fossil fuel industry. I wonder how long a peaceful resistance can hold out against the imposing super structure of the fossil fuel industry. That being said, Against Doom does not promise or outline an easy fix. Make no mistake, the odds stacked against doom are incredible. They are not, however, impossible to overcome. Brecher provides an analysis of growing awareness toward climate change and, in some cases, a willingness to act for a just future across the board.

Hopefully if these—and other— solutions are carried out, humanity will likely see a globally strong force of climate warriors, who will guide our species away from certain disaster. Though these methods of transition reveal that humanity will witness drastic changes and possible losses, to much of what we take for granted, if these solutions are carefully acted upon, we may still see a brighter tomorrow and a world worthy of being rebuilt and cared for by our fragile species. Consider Against Doom as a supplementary guide, filled with hope, to that future.